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Author Topic: Question for the Corvette Guys  (Read 1064 times)
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BigBlock
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« on: September 06, 2017, 09:29:45 AM »

I was in Kentucky to see the eclipse and had to drive by the Corvette Museum, so since it was right there, and I might never get back that way I stopped in. I was surprised at all the info and cars they had including the wrecked ones. I finally understand this C1,C2.. thing and why the 1983 Corvette was killed by the union. Looking at the displays about the fiberglass bodies there was info about the MFG company in Ashtabula, Ohio and GM itself making the body parts, no mention anywhere about AO Smith. I asked a volunteer who was wearing a 67 Corvette shirt and he sent me to the 'Historian' a very nice lady who said if I could leave my name and phone number she would look it up and call me. I politely passed on her offer. Am I wrong about Smith making the Vette fiberglass??  Undecided
If not what years did they do it?

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Coralsnake
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« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2017, 09:55:17 AM »

http://www.thecoralsnake.com/Corvette.htm

You dont have to be a "Corvette guy" to know history. You just need to be smarter than a Corvette "historian...", gee a job opportunity....

 Hysterical



« Last Edit: September 06, 2017, 09:56:59 AM by Coralsnake » Logged

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« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2017, 10:05:10 AM »

http://www.thecoralsnake.com/Corvette.htm

You dont have to be a "Corvette guy" to know history. You just need to be smarter than a Corvette "historian...", gee a job opportunity....

 Hysterical



That's funny. When I got my black Cobra in 1983 a guy at work was giving me static for my foreign made car with just an American drive train. I suggested that he do some research on his "All American" 1965 Corvette. After his research on his particular car he never said anything again about my foreign car.

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Dan Case (a.k.a. rr64)
1964 Cobra owner since 1983, Cobra crazy since I saw my first one in the mid 1960s in Huntsville, AL.
CorvetteMike (formerly mikeljgt500kr)
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« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2017, 11:41:11 AM »

I am not too surprised the people at the NCM do not know all the minute details of the Corvette's history.  Those kind of details, like what plants the various engines came from and when, and numerous others, is not common knowledge there.  As a Corvette master judge, I can tell you the AO Smith bodies were very distinctive and easy to spot during judging.  They have a unique trim tag that specifies it is an AO Smith body, the paint and trim process was different at AO Smith than GM's unit, so overspray, paint coverage (AO Smith bodies have more paint coverage on the hard to get to areas of the body), and many other items are distinctive.  Also, AO Smith was not allowed to make bodies for side exhaust cars, or for '67 427s with the "Stinger" hood, so fakes are easy to spot.  In the end, GM decided AO Smith bodies were not of the quality they wanted, and they ended the contract after just a few years of C2 production, 1964-1967, thus a very minor part of Corvette history.

« Last Edit: September 06, 2017, 11:53:46 AM by CorvetteMike (formerly mikeljgt500kr) » Logged
MyShelbyDream
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« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2017, 12:16:13 PM »

That's funny. When I got my black Cobra in 1983 a guy at work was giving me static for my foreign made car with just an American drive train. I suggested that he do some research on his "All American" 1965 Corvette. After his research on his particular car he never said anything again about my foreign car.

Wow, I wondering if he is kicking himself now.  What was the better investment, his Corvette, or your Cobra?   Head knock

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Brian Glover
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« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2017, 12:35:18 PM »

Wow, I wondering if he is kicking himself now.  What was the better investment, his Corvette, or your Cobra?   Head knock

Investment? His Corvette might have been. As of 2014 his car had not run since about 1979. Our old Cobra, the most fun thing to drive I can imagine and I have driven all kinds of vehicles stock and not one wheel (unicycle) to six made between 1902 and 2017.

Investment, we don't see the three old cars we have that way. Someday my son will have to worry about what they are worth but we don't Smiley

« Last Edit: September 06, 2017, 12:50:28 PM by rr64 » Logged

Dan Case (a.k.a. rr64)
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« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2017, 01:20:15 PM »

 In the end, GM decided AO Smith bodies were not of the quality they wanted, and they ended the contract after just a few years of C2 production, 1964-1967, thus a very minor part of Corvette history.

I would say that GM ended AO Smith bodies because the quality was too good compared to St. Louis Wink

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CorvetteMike (formerly mikeljgt500kr)
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« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2017, 02:36:03 PM »

I would say that GM ended AO Smith bodies because the quality was too good compared to St. Louis Wink

Right, that makes sense........ HeadSpin

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car 26-JD
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« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2017, 03:46:25 PM »

I would say that GM ended AO Smith bodies because the quality was too good compared to St. Louis Wink
+1

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06 GT
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« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2017, 04:47:00 PM »

We came home from SAAC via the Corvette Museum. I was disappointed mostly owner modified cars on loan. Maybe 20-30 factory/concept ones usually parked in the back row so they were hard to see. Also noticed Pete Brock wasn't on the wall of fame - was going to write a scathing letter to them I mean here was a kid who penned what became the most iconic Corvette and he's missing from the history. They did add him later this year as an entusiast but no mention of his time at GM.

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CorvetteMike (formerly mikeljgt500kr)
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« Reply #10 on: September 06, 2017, 06:15:57 PM »

You must have missed all the many dozens of historic and significant Corvettes most of us go to see, pity you have no distinctions for Corvettes like you do for Shelbys. But most Corvette people know Peter was, like AO Smith, a small footnote in Corvette history that lasted a very short time and was not as significant as the ones in the actual Hall of Fame at NCM, that is reserved for icons like Duntov, Mitchel, Earl, McLellan, Cole, Pike, etc.

The facts are: "While attending Art Center School (Art Center College of Design), Brock at the age of 19 became the youngest designer ever hired by General Motors' design department, GM Styling. In November 1957, Brock drew the sketch which GM VP of Design Bill Mitchell picked to become the preliminary design of the next Corvette, the Corvette Stingray. As GM had made a commitment to not engage in racing (known as the AMA ban) Brock worked with Mitchell in 1958 in one of the design studios, creating the prototype of the Stingray racer. The production car was renamed the Sting Ray[1] and was released in 1963, almost 4 years after Brock had left GM."   Brock designed a race car,  the XP87 Corvette Sting Ray Racer, not the '63 Sting Ray that was world famous.  Brock was there just a short time and did not create any car designs for production, thus he is an "Enthusiast" for the NCM Hall, not worthy of the level of Shinoda and Mitchell, and others.

Here is Brock's sketch, you decide of this is the iconic '63 SWC:

The hard work of designing a production car was done by Larry Shinoda and Bill Mitchell, they are in the GM and NCM Hall of Fame:"Along with Bill Mitchell, designer Larry Shinoda has been closely associated with the Corvette Sting Ray, the stunning design that debuted in 1963. The Sting Ray literally set the world on its ear. Few American cars were so instantly recognizable, so clean, and so pure. For the first time in its history, the Corvette staked its own uniquely American ground instead of looking to sports car tradition and Europe for inspiration. Larry played a major role in the execution of that design-from the original Q Corvette to the 1963 Split Window."

BTW, I have volunteered to lead the tour of the Shelby American Museum in 'Vegas when we have our NCRS National there next year.  Since I had three vehicles, sort of, "built" there I am planning an interesting tour.  Of course the NCM is right next door to the Corvette factory, so people can see new Corvettes being made after touring the museum, you can kind of do that at Vegas too I guess, but I suspect no Corvette people will be as impressed with the Shelby Museum and factory as they are with the Corvette version........ Hysterical



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shelby73
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« Reply #11 on: September 06, 2017, 06:38:17 PM »

The biggest difference between the Shelby factory and museum and the Corvette factory is the tax payers didn't loose billions on Shelby like they did on GM. You can build nice plants using everybody else's money. And by the way I have had several Corvettes and still have one.

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Coralsnake
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« Reply #12 on: September 06, 2017, 06:48:01 PM »

Just ask Elon Musk, who has fleeced us for billions

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« Reply #13 on: September 06, 2017, 07:13:29 PM »

pity you have no distinctions for Corvettes like you do for Shelbys.
 I suspect no Corvette people will be as impressed with the Shelby Museum and factory as they are with the Corvette version........ Hysterical
oops - my first Vette was in 1967 age 17 a 1954 complete with Blue Flame 6 and powerglide. Then there was the 63 Roadster followed by a 66 396 Coupe. The last one was an 86 underpowered slug. 4 Vettes and only two Shelbys 66 & 68. The Shelby factory museum isn't all that impressive. Yes I mentioned the dozens of historic Vettes displayed behind the others. As a side note my admission tickets showed up on my CC statement as a donation to the museum so at least I'll get a little write off.

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shelby73
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« Reply #14 on: September 06, 2017, 07:20:47 PM »

Just ask Elon Musk, who has fleeced us for billions
[/quote He sells his cars to tree huggers that think they are curing climate change at the same time he's building space ships to pollute. Go figure


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