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Author Topic: GT500 Factory Air Fan Clutch Question  (Read 832 times)
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docket
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1967 GT500 Factory Red/Factory AC, 2005 Ford GT


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« on: September 02, 2017, 04:43:41 AM »

My GT500 is getting pretty close to overheating and will occasionally spit a little bit out of the cap.  I noticed that my fan clutch is not a Ford part number and is probably some sort of non Ford replacement part.  I also noticed that my lower radiator hose does not appear to have a spring inside of it.  I have no idea what thermostat is in the engine as I have not pulled that yet.  The radiator itself looks great and although I have no official history on the engine I am suspecting that this engine has very low time since its last rebuild.

My plan at this point is probably to do a lower radiator hose spring, fan clutch and new thermostat.  I saw that Semo Classic Mustang has a decent looking reproduction part which is reproduced with the right Ford PN (I think).  So here is the question: What is the right fan clutch for a 1967 GT500 with factory air and where would you buy one?  My car is not a concours car but is a pretty nice example and I would prefer, when possible, to replace with right parts.

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Paul Orr
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« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2017, 08:53:10 AM »

Contact Chris Brown.  I just bout one for my 68 500.  My car runs 10-20 degrees cooler with it, depending on speed.  I had bought a cheaper parts store clutch to diagnose the problem and it actually ran hotter, so I assumed my clutch was ok.  Chris' clutch is much tighter.  Best money I ever spent.  The lower hose spring is also a good idea.  I started a thread in the 68 section that has lots of good ideas and opinions.

http://saacforum.com/index.php?topic=40720.0

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1957 Thunderbird F code
1959 Cadillac 62 Series convertible
1966 Mustang GT convertible
1968 GT500 convertible #0181
2016 Ford "Exploder"
2016 F450 King Ranch
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« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2017, 08:59:57 AM »

Don't PM him.  Contact him through his website or email him directly at cbrownmustangs@hotmail.com.  Great product and a great guy to deal with.

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1957 Thunderbird F code
1959 Cadillac 62 Series convertible
1966 Mustang GT convertible
1968 GT500 convertible #0181
2016 Ford "Exploder"
2016 F450 King Ranch
Chris Thauberger
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« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2017, 10:06:59 AM »

I always thought the lower hose spring was installed by Ford due to the way they evacuated air from the system during the initial coolant filling. A properly maintained cooling system runs under pressure during normal operation and collapsing a hose is highly unlikely. JMHO

Chris  Chug a Lug

« Last Edit: September 02, 2017, 12:41:42 PM by Chris Thauberger » Logged

1966 Mustang drop top 4 speed
1968 G.T. 500



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« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2017, 10:12:47 AM »

At higher rpms, if your radiator isn't flowing 100%, the lower hose can collapse without it.    Chug a Lug

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1957 Thunderbird F code
1959 Cadillac 62 Series convertible
1966 Mustang GT convertible
1968 GT500 convertible #0181
2016 Ford "Exploder"
2016 F450 King Ranch
Chris Thauberger
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« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2017, 12:32:24 PM »

At higher rpms, if your radiator isn't flowing 100%, the lower hose can collapse without it.    Chug a Lug

Wouldn't that make the radiator the problem and a spring in the lower hose just a band-aid solution?

http://www.martiauto.com/faqfocus.cfm?qid=20

Contact Chris Brown.  I just bout one for my 68 500.  My car runs 10-20 degrees cooler with it, depending on speed.  I had bought a cheaper parts store clutch to diagnose the problem and it actually ran hotter, so I assumed my clutch was ok.  Chris' clutch is much tighter.  Best money I ever spent.  The lower hose spring is also a good idea.  I started a thread in the 68 section that has lots of good ideas and opinions.

http://saacforum.com/index.php?topic=40720.0

Have to agree here. Chris makes an incredible part concours correct.

Chris  Chug a Lug

« Last Edit: September 02, 2017, 12:42:15 PM by Chris Thauberger » Logged

1966 Mustang drop top 4 speed
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"Quality means doing it right when no one is looking" 
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« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2017, 01:13:40 PM »

I put one in just to eliminate the possibility of the hose collapsing.  The thermostat opening is much smaller than the lower hose, so there will be a lower pressure there than in the block.  Like I said, it was more of a precaution.  That is also the reason I used a high flow thermostat to reduce the low pressure at the water pump.  I was willing to try anything to improve my cooling system.   Hysterical

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1957 Thunderbird F code
1959 Cadillac 62 Series convertible
1966 Mustang GT convertible
1968 GT500 convertible #0181
2016 Ford "Exploder"
2016 F450 King Ranch
Chris Thauberger
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« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2017, 02:13:08 PM »

Sorry Paul I guess I misunderstood what you were saying.  HeadSpin

No harm no foul. 

Chris  Chug a Lug

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1966 Mustang drop top 4 speed
1968 G.T. 500



"Quality means doing it right when no one is looking" 
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« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2017, 03:17:59 PM »

The lower radiator hose is on the suction side of the pump some pumps in operation can draw a vacuum and collapse the hose the spring stops that from happening.

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Chris Thauberger
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« Reply #9 on: September 03, 2017, 03:32:33 PM »

The lower radiator hose is on the suction side of the pump some pumps in operation can draw a vacuum and collapse the hose the spring stops that from happening.

I understand the theory, I just don't subscribe to it. A spring is not the solution.

Chris  Chug a Lug

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1966 Mustang drop top 4 speed
1968 G.T. 500



"Quality means doing it right when no one is looking" 
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« Reply #10 on: September 03, 2017, 03:54:56 PM »

I understand the theory, I just don't subscribe to it. A spring is not the solution.

Chris  Chug a Lug

How else would you keep it from collapsing? I have seen the spring used successfully in many applications.

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Chris Thauberger
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« Reply #11 on: September 03, 2017, 06:53:11 PM »

How else would you keep it from collapsing? I have seen the spring used successfully in many applications.

Ok, just to be clear I'm talking about a stock big block not a 700 HP stroker with nitrous or other modifications to the cooling system.

I just finished my car in May and the lower hose doesn't collapse no matter what I do.  I understand that installing a spring in the lower hose will help to keep it from collapsing if that is what you are experiancing.  What I'm saying is the collapsing hose is probably not the origin of the problem so applying the solution to that particular symptom is not solving the issue. If collapsing lower rad hoses was an issue from the factory I'm sure there would have been a TSB about it. Maybe there is one, I don't know as its not my area of interest.

I can't remember a lower hose ever collapsing in any car I have owned over the last 30 years(all stock). Some might think I'm just lucky. The truth is I'm very fussy about my vehicles and I'm a fluids guy.  The rest of you fluid guys know what I'm talking about  Wink

I would just hate to see someone go away thinking that a spring in the lower hose is the solution to their overheating problems.  Not saying it doesn't alleviate the symptom, it just doesn't eliminate the problem because without the spring the hose would probably still collapse.

Chris  Chug a Lug

« Last Edit: September 04, 2017, 05:15:52 AM by Chris Thauberger » Logged

1966 Mustang drop top 4 speed
1968 G.T. 500



"Quality means doing it right when no one is looking" 
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« Reply #12 on: September 03, 2017, 10:45:48 PM »

Chris how have you verified your lower hose has never got narrower from the water pump acting on it ?

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Chris Thauberger
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« Reply #13 on: September 04, 2017, 04:39:08 AM »

Chris how have you verified your lower hose has never got narrower from the water pump acting on it ?

Same way you all have verified it has collapsed, naturally  Hysterical

I broke my drive line in as an assembly.


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dm9_s_Vyg7A" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dm9_s_Vyg7A</a>

This was in my opinion the best way to discover potential problems. I had three. An exhaust manifold leak on the passenger side, a small leak where the vacuum tree threads into the thermostat housing, and the back cover of the water pump had a small weeping leak. I removed all three parts, corrected the deficiencies and reinstalled them. The back plate on the water pump was removed, cleaned and reinstalled with a new gasket(thicker home made from sheet stock) and thread locking compound just to make sure the weeping stopped.

I guess I could have just dumped a can of bars leak in the rad and that would have solved the problem too, but that's just not the way I fix things. I did not observe the lower rad hose narrowing or collapsing during the time the driveline was on the stand. I started and ran it up to operating temperature everyday(cause it was exciting for me) and didn't find any more issues.


This has been a fun discussion and I have said my peace. Clearly there are differing opinions on the matter. If you are convinced putting a spring in the lower rad hose or using bars leak is beneficial then go ahead and do it. It cant hurt nothing right?  Wink

Chris Chug a Lug

« Last Edit: September 04, 2017, 06:53:14 AM by Chris Thauberger » Logged

1966 Mustang drop top 4 speed
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"Quality means doing it right when no one is looking" 
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« Reply #14 on: September 04, 2017, 07:52:34 AM »

Did you have to remachine the exhaust manifold to fix that leak?

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