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Author Topic: 428PI still running hot  (Read 8284 times)
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Bob Gaines
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« Reply #60 on: July 13, 2017, 09:46:26 AM »

The radiator is manufactured in California by US Radiator.  NPD carries them in stock.  Check out this video.  https://youtu.be/WfQl4Fxz51U   The tube and fin designs they use are very good and increase heat transfer.   I have a 20 inch radiator.  I am using a 1970 Boss 302 fan blade that has no clutch - just a spacer.  It really moves a lot of air.  
For those reading the 20 inch radiator is the stock SB base no option radiator width. If upgrading cooling in a 69 GT350 FYI a 24 inch radiator width was standard (heavy duty cooling) in A/C equipped GT350 cars.  I used a original 24 inch SB radiator in one of my 69 GT350's (4 speed no A/C) because it was a stock option and had more cooling capacity. I recored a original just because it was more stock looking . If you aren't as fussy as myself then look for a aftermarket radiator brand with a stock shaped top tank.Less desirable is a non stock appearing top tank because it stands out as such. If cooling is a issue , going with the largest stock size available for that application makes the good sense .

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427heaven
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« Reply #61 on: July 13, 2017, 10:14:58 AM »

^^^^^ +1 or if you are trying to cool down an angry hot beast like a big block or race car or a very hot southwest car and looks are secondary you could go with an aluminum painted black and really cool things off that's what most performance engines use because of extremely good heat dissipation.

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stickshift
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« Reply #62 on: July 13, 2017, 10:28:29 AM »

^^^^^ +1 or if you are trying to cool down an angry hot beast like a big block or race car or a very hot southwest car and looks are secondary you could go with an aluminum painted black and really cool things off that's what most performance engines use because of extremely good heat dissipation.

I respectfully disagree Daddy. The Pantera people go through this all the time. Aluminum is not a better radiator material then brass. Brass is the best and you can repair it if it leaks. Aluminum is $.23 a pound here in scrap.

...and my hair isn't red, never was red, never will be red. It is grey. Kind of matches platinum grey primer so I don't wear a cap when I paint.  Wink

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robert campbell
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« Reply #63 on: July 13, 2017, 01:30:27 PM »

I recored radiators and heater cores during the late 60's and early 70's.  Brass/copper was the material of choice.  And it was easy to work with when compared to aluminum.  I am not a physicist of a chemist, but both materials are great heat exchangers.

But, the technology of the newer aluminum radiator is far superior to the cores that these cars came with originally.  They offer wider tubes that increase the contact area to the fins which allows for far better heat transfer capabilities.  More area carrying the liquid, creating better heat transfer.

Another think it the radiator business is paint on the cores themselves.  Heater cores were always left unpainted.  We painted radiator cores with a thin pint that was diluted by gasoline as a thinner.  No we did not have any fires.  We very lightly applied this paint to the core, thanks and mount brackets.  It was very durable, and designed to not insulate as many other paints do.

Always paint your radiator cores very sparingly.  Thick paint equals less heat transfer.

Rob   

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2112
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« Reply #64 on: July 13, 2017, 02:26:41 PM »

Robert, is the Radiator shop you worked at still around? If so, are they still good?

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gt350hr
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« Reply #65 on: July 13, 2017, 02:39:36 PM »

   My physics book says optimum heat removal from a heat generator is aided by the largest heat exchanger possible which hold the largest possible volume of liquid to be cooled. Kind of  a "duh" statement.

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owner 6S477 HERTZ White w/Blue stripes-1of18-since 1974. OVER 3,500 drag strip runs made in it since then. My candidate for the "worlds Most drag raced Shelby" More added all the time.
427heaven
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« Reply #66 on: July 13, 2017, 02:52:07 PM »

Well I am not a scientist or physicist but if you look at 99% of performance or race cars around the globe you will find an aluminum radiator cooling things down, this for heat dissipation and heat transfer. IT is used to cool down engines worth 10s or 100s of thousands of dollars because of what it does, not because of a street value of 31 cents a pound for scrap.Todays little popcorn farters use mostly plastic radiators and an occasional copper radiator because it is cheaper not because it is better for its cooling properties.  Wink

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Bob Gaines
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« Reply #67 on: July 13, 2017, 02:57:22 PM »

I recored radiators and heater cores during the late 60's and early 70's.  Brass/copper was the material of choice.  And it was easy to work with when compared to aluminum.  I am not a physicist of a chemist, but both materials are great heat exchangers.

But, the technology of the newer aluminum radiator is far superior to the cores that these cars came with originally.  They offer wider tubes that increase the contact area to the fins which allows for far better heat transfer capabilities.  More area carrying the liquid, creating better heat transfer.

Another think it the radiator business is paint on the cores themselves.  Heater cores were always left unpainted.  We painted radiator cores with a thin pint that was diluted by gasoline as a thinner.  No we did not have any fires.  We very lightly applied this paint to the core, thanks and mount brackets.  It was very durable, and designed to not insulate as many other paints do.

Always paint your radiator cores very sparingly.  Thick paint equals less heat transfer.

Rob   
East wood sells a paint specifically for radiators. It is supposed to not interfere with heat transfer as much. http://www.eastwood.com/ew-radiator-black-12oz-satin-finish.html  . It comes in satin and gloss.

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robert campbell
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« Reply #68 on: July 13, 2017, 03:26:57 PM »

East wood sells a paint specifically for radiators. It is supposed to not interfere with heat transfer as much. http://www.eastwood.com/ew-radiator-black-12oz-satin-finish.html  . It comes in satin and gloss.

Bob,
I did not know that!  Great information!

Rob

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robert campbell
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« Reply #69 on: July 13, 2017, 03:29:33 PM »

Robert, is the Radiator shop you worked at still around? If so, are they still good?

Yes they are!  They do great work, but only in the brass/copper stuff.  Their name is Ward's Radiator and they are located here in Bremerton Washington.  When you do great work, you stay in business a long time!

Rob

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stickshift
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« Reply #70 on: July 13, 2017, 04:52:16 PM »

Physics being consistent generally throughout the known Universe, there is only one reason to put an aluminum radiator in a Pantera. To save weight.

Why do I mention Panteras? Same problem over there. All that 'lumin glistening in the sun just attracts all those street sluts to drool over your wheels.

Of course these days all that shinny aluminum with all of those welds is just bit chin so I guess that is another reason and probably the greater of the two.

Since the laws of physics are consistent, it applies to Shelby's as well as other Mustangs and EVEN Camaros although don't attempt to debate anything over there. One can not engage in a battle of whits with an unarmed opponent.

Here at least it is POSSIBLE. Unless perhaps you have another dealer installed 427 in a '68? There, no reasoning with that owner at all.

Maybe, at least there, the phony dealer invoice would be from the correct time period?


Ask the head judges here, what you say on an aluminum radiator on a 68 KR?   Hysterical

« Last Edit: July 13, 2017, 04:57:46 PM by stickshift » Logged
Rodster-500
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« Reply #71 on: July 13, 2017, 07:38:55 PM »

Have you seen the Mr G Thermocap?
Being discussed on the CJ forum
https://www.428cobrajet.org/forum/index.php?topic=24395.0



Interesting!   Chug a Lug

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There is a fine line between genius and insanity
Rodster-500
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« Reply #72 on: July 13, 2017, 07:49:33 PM »

Bob,
I did not know that!  Great information!

Rob

Paint mixed with gas in a can....   Grin

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2112
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« Reply #73 on: July 13, 2017, 07:57:28 PM »

Yes they are!  They do great work, but only in the brass/copper stuff.  Their name is Ward's Radiator and they are located here in Bremerton Washington.  When you do great work, you stay in business a long time!

Rob

Ha! Ward's, not Walt's!

Thanks, I will keep that in my Rolodex for future reference.

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Peter L.
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« Reply #74 on: July 14, 2017, 11:41:28 AM »

Wow, your head must really be spinning by now. I honestly don't think that 200 degrees is anything to worry about.
 You didn't say how many miles are on the engine. A fresh rebuild is going to be tight for a few thousand miles, and therefore generate more heat. Give it a chance to fully break in and loosen up a bit. At 60% flow in the radiator, that's where I would start.
                         Pete.

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KR 04052
69 Fairlane Cobra Formal Roof Drag Pack
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