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Author Topic: Concours Looking Plug Wires  (Read 1695 times)
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Shelby_0022
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« Reply #15 on: November 14, 2017, 09:12:47 AM »

Just a quick follow-up:

I purchased a set of plug wires through Marti several months ago to get the period correct look.  And, I can confirm now after many, many trips that they works great with a pertronix setup!   Party on

Happy semi-concoursing ya'll!  Grin

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1967 GT350 - 0022
1968 GT350 Convertible - 02778
Texas Swede
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« Reply #16 on: November 14, 2017, 09:52:56 AM »

On my 67 with a 289 HiPo in Sweden I bought the first edition of Pertronix including their coil and used Marti's
HiPo steel core wires. I run the system through the original resistor wire. Didn't feel like the car ran at it's full potential
so I bought the Pertronix wires and, whoa! what a difference. However, the car started to act up a few years ago and died on
me several times. Isolated the problem to the Pertronix coil and replaced it with an original Ford coil. Since then, no problems
what so ever. Just a few days ago I read that I shouldn't use the original resistor wire but run a steady 12 volts instead
as the module may get hot and die. Don't want to change anything as long as it works well.
Texas Swede

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67350#1242
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« Reply #17 on: November 14, 2017, 10:28:07 AM »

Quote
Just a few days ago I read that I shouldn't use the original resistor wire but run a steady 12 volts instead
as the module may get hot and die. Don't want to change anything as long as it works well.
Texas Swede

I have always thought the purpose of the resistor wire was to protect the coil from overheating due to too much primary current.  Like when key is left in the on position and points closed, or maybe even with extended running.

The issue with the Pertronix module getting it's power source through the resistance wire is that it was designed to have 12 volt source, and if the voltage drops too low the module will become unstable.  The resistor wire will drop voltage as current is drawn through it.  There is probably no danger of the module overheating, but it could cause a miss, especially at higher RPM.

With my car I left the resistor wire feeding the coil and ran a hidden switched 12v sourced from the ign switch before the pink wire (bypassed).  Now I have full 12v at module and don't worry about coil overheating.

 This is something to consider if you begin to notice a miss or erratic ignition problems.   Kurt.

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Bob Gaines
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« Reply #18 on: November 14, 2017, 10:39:18 AM »

On my 67 with a 289 HiPo in Sweden I bought the first edition of Pertronix including their coil and used Marti's
HiPo steel core wires. I run the system through the original resistor wire. Didn't feel like the car ran at it's full potential
so I bought the Pertronix wires and, whoa! what a difference. However, the car started to act up a few years ago and died on
me several times. Isolated the problem to the Pertronix coil and replaced it with an original Ford coil. Since then, no problems
what so ever. Just a few days ago I read that I shouldn't use the original resistor wire but run a steady 12 volts instead
as the module may get hot and die. Don't want to change anything as long as it works well.
Texas Swede
The module needs the full 12v . If less then 12V it will not get hot and die it will not have enough power and may die because of that. I have seen some supposed died ones that once full 12v was given tho them they came alive. The Ford coil if subjected to full 12v (like when hot wiring a car) will get very hot and eventually burn out. Not to complicate things but thought I would mention that the most common pertronix coil has to have 12V for full potential the same with power to the module. Problems can be traced back to the less then 12V most times. There is another pertronix coil that is designed to run on the lower voltage Ford resister wire. All of the longer pertronix coils that I have seen have needed the full 12V like the distributor module. It is only the shorter epoxy coils that I have seen that there were two different varieties. The internal resistor coil =12v and external resistor = Ford resistor wire. Both will run on the Ford resistor wire just one better then the other . I am not up on the pertonix but I think the module is only meant to run on 12v . It will work on the Ford resistor wire but some may have problems like dying for no reason. Just some more info to help figure out what is best or diagnose problems.

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Bob Gaines
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« Reply #19 on: November 14, 2017, 10:57:41 AM »

When running a pertronix module AND coil you can always bypass the resistor wire in the harness portion under the dash that goes out to the coil to give a full 12v . Since there is no Ford coil you can do that. It is harder then running a extra wire but more tidy. A extra wire typically looks more non stock IMO. You can try and hide a extra wire but it will not be hidden from any eagle eyed enthusiast. Of course hiding the extra wire coming from the distributor is a even more difficult matter. Anyone that thinks the extra distributor wire can be faked successfully just hasn't had anyone who knows what they are looking at (many veteran enthusiasts) examine it. FYI if you are going to do concours do not do a pertronix. If you want the pertronix wait until concours is over THEN install it.  

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Shelby Car Enthusiast, Collector, Shelby Concours Judge
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