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Author Topic: What oil to use and should I use an oil treatment?  (Read 1853 times)
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427heaven
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« Reply #30 on: September 12, 2017, 05:37:52 PM »

 Cheesy
And to be honest, I'm not running the 24hrs of Daytona in my car. I'm not doing 1/4 mile runs. I'm not taking it on a road course. For my purposes, I'm sure any respectable oil is fine for cruising around. I think that changing it on a regular schedule is the best thing of all.
[/quote    This was a good read and always brings a lot of personal experiences. The explanation from 1690 covers it all in my eyes. Toodeling around] with a stock small or big block would have adequate protection for at least 100,000 even with standard 30 weight if maintained regularly. My 63 split window as an all original car with a stock 327 driven normally with an occasional spirited drive has lasted 109k miles, runs as new and has never been apart running on a diet of Pennzoil 30 weight- remember that Cheesy High rpm, heavy pulling,solid cams,and the such could use all the above mentioned products all high quality products and are all very personal to its users,


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jim mac
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« Reply #31 on: September 13, 2017, 06:10:10 AM »

There is a TON of information about oils on this forum, its been discussed many times before.  If you have some time, search "ZDDP" and you will see lots of posts. 

If you really have a lot of time, check out this site, it has everything you want to know about motor oil...  https://bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php/forum_summary

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« Reply #32 on: September 13, 2017, 12:23:47 PM »

For what it is worth, I researched this to death a few years ago.  I use Brad Penn 10W30 high performance oil, partial synthetic.

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shelby001
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« Reply #33 on: September 18, 2017, 07:05:40 AM »

There is a TON of information about oils on this forum, its been discussed many times before.  If you have some time, search "ZDDP" and you will see lots of posts. 

If you really have a lot of time, check out this site, it has everything you want to know about motor oil...  https://bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php/forum_summary

Wow quite detailed worth reading ,
Thanks for Sharing

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« Reply #34 on: September 18, 2017, 10:18:52 AM »

Valvoline VR1 also comes in 10-30,20-50, if you don't live where it's 100* all the time 10-30 is better on cars that sit a lot,oil get to components much quicker,= less wear

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zray
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« Reply #35 on: September 18, 2017, 11:14:41 AM »

Valvoline VR1 also comes in 10-30,20-50, if you don't live where it's 100* all the time 10-30 is better on cars that sit a lot,oil get to components much quicker,= less wear

With all due respect, a 10w-30 is NOT going to get to the bearings or anywhere else in the engine any faster than a 15w-50 oil.  The oil pump design controls the amount of moved on each revolution.  The Fords use a positive displacement pump, a pump that will move the same amount of liquid each revolution whether it is 10w-30, 15w-50, molasses, or water.  The varying viscosities of these liquids, and the bearing clearances, will impact the  oil pressure in the system, but not impact how much oil is pumped with each revolution, or how fast the pumped oil is getting to the end of the crankshaft.

 If you want the oil to get somewhere faster, then you have to change the size of the oil pump gears, as Melling does with the high volume oil pumps. This will move more oil with each revolution, which is the only way to move it faster.

Z

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Bigfoot
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« Reply #36 on: September 18, 2017, 12:16:12 PM »

Very interesting Z.

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« Reply #37 on: September 18, 2017, 01:27:25 PM »

  Messing with additives can certainly get you in trouble. Arbitrarily adding ZDDP for example can put so much into the oil that it will not stay in 'suspension" and will coat the bottom of the oil pan with a thick goo. (the ZDDP). Same for adding "viscosity improvers" or other "miracle additives".
    Oil pump output  ( as ZRay mentioned) is consistent in a positive displacement gerotor oil pump. "Cold" oil shows higher pressure than it does when it is hot. The lower viscosity ( hotter oil) flows through the bearings easier and the pressure drops a bit , but the pump is still pumping the same amount regardless. It only varies by RPM. Add on parts like oil coolers and multiple oil filters slow the flow of oil into the engine by adding restrictions before the oil gets into the oil passages in the block. "Heavier weight" oils are only "needed" in higher heat usage. You don't want 50W in Alaska or 0w in Arizona. Multi weights allow more flexibility . "Older" engines were/are built with larger clearances than more modern engines and can use heavier weight oils.  10-30 or 10-40 is fine in a 289-302 but a 5.0 roller cam late model Mustang can run 5-20 or 5-30 and be good. Synthetics can be great and provide longer oil change intervals without worry. I go 8-10,000 per change in my '98 5.0 Explorer loaded with Mobile 1 ( 5-30 because of 196,000 on the clock). My race car has 20-50 Brad Penn, Kendall GT1, Now made by DA lubricants. "The Green Oil".

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« Reply #38 on: September 18, 2017, 06:02:26 PM »

  Messing with additives can certainly get you in trouble. Arbitrarily adding ZDDP for example can put so much into the oil that it will not stay in 'suspension" and will coat the bottom of the oil pan with a thick goo. (the ZDDP). Same for adding "viscosity improvers" or other "miracle additives".
    Oil pump output  ( as ZRay mentioned) is consistent in a positive displacement gerotor oil pump. "Cold" oil shows higher pressure than it does when it is hot. The lower viscosity ( hotter oil) flows through the bearings easier and the pressure drops a bit , but the pump is still pumping the same amount regardless. It only varies by RPM. Add on parts like oil coolers and multiple oil filters slow the flow of oil into the engine by adding restrictions before the oil gets into the oil passages in the block. "Heavier weight" oils are only "needed" in higher heat usage. You don't want 50W in Alaska or 0w in Arizona. Multi weights allow more flexibility . "Older" engines were/are built with larger clearances than more modern engines and can use heavier weight oils.  10-30 or 10-40 is fine in a 289-302 but a 5.0 roller cam late model Mustang can run 5-20 or 5-30 and be good. Synthetics can be great and provide longer oil change intervals without worry. I go 8-10,000 per change in my '98 5.0 Explorer loaded with Mobile 1 ( 5-30 because of 196,000 on the clock). My race car has 20-50 Brad Penn, Kendall GT1, Now made by DA lubricants. "The Green Oil".

Same thing the Shell tech told me when I called the hotline regarding new oils and old engines.  He suggested using an oil with know Zinc and Phosphorus amounts.

I recently read the latest CK diesel oil specifications no longer include the flat tappet testing but of course that's not stated on the bottle! At one point Ford did not approve the CK oils for use in their diesel engines. Don't know if that has changed lately?

After reading the article and seeing the last Shell Rotella T4 Diesel oil I bought was the new CK spec, I called the hotline once again.  The tech told me the Zinc and Phosphorus levels are the same in the old CJ oil. 1200 ppm Zinc and 1100 ppm Phosphorus.




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