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Author Topic: Care of suspension while lifting a car  (Read 5010 times)
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KYSHELBYGT350
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« Reply #30 on: March 19, 2017, 08:33:13 PM »

If someone would run with it, I would be in for two...looks easy enough to fab up from the drawings.

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Bob Gaines
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« Reply #31 on: March 19, 2017, 08:38:57 PM »

If someone would run with it, I would be in for two...looks easy enough to fab up from the drawings.
I just took the specs to my local metal by the foot store and they cut all of the pieces. I just had to weld them together.

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« Reply #32 on: March 20, 2017, 02:01:12 AM »

I'll purchase a pair if someone has them made.

Steve

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« Reply #33 on: March 20, 2017, 04:42:16 AM »

Just a thought, but would it be prudent to add something like a dipped material on the outside of the tool to prevent scratching nicely restored suspension pieces?  It would also limit the possibility of the tool slipping.  I know it wasn't originally spec'ed out, but I'm sure they could never have conceived of these vehicles being concours restored so many years later.

 




* Plastidip.jpg (39.01 KB, 377x456 - viewed 36 times.)
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BryanW
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« Reply #34 on: March 20, 2017, 06:05:32 AM »

Just a thought, but would it be prudent to add something like a dipped material on the outside of the tool to prevent scratching nicely restored suspension pieces?  It would also limit the possibility of the tool slipping.  I know it wasn't originally spec'ed out, but I'm sure they could never have conceived of these vehicles being concours restored so many years later.

 

            idea That was my thought also, even if you just dipped the ends or contact areas of the tool.   PeelOut

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Steve McDonald (formally mcdonas)
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« Reply #35 on: March 20, 2017, 06:33:52 AM »

Might go down to my buddies welding shop today and make a few. Will post pictures if I get it done


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« Reply #36 on: March 20, 2017, 06:43:06 AM »

I would buy two [2] pair.

All the best, Steve

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« Reply #37 on: March 20, 2017, 07:55:18 AM »

I'm in for a pair.

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Greg Z
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« Reply #38 on: March 20, 2017, 10:33:46 AM »

Just a thought, but would it be prudent to add something like a dipped material on the outside of the tool to prevent scratching nicely restored suspension pieces?  It would also limit the possibility of the tool slipping.  I know it wasn't originally spec'ed out, but I'm sure they could never have conceived of these vehicles being concours restored so many years later.

A few layers of masking tape would probably do just as well.  The plasti-dip would most likely break off after a few uses.

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Bob Gaines
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« Reply #39 on: March 20, 2017, 10:39:05 AM »

A few layers of masking tape would probably do just as well.  The plasti-dip would most likely break off after a few uses.
I use the tape for that reason after the dip rubbed /tore off.

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« Reply #40 on: March 20, 2017, 10:46:06 AM »

Ive had that drawing at my fab shop for a long time.  I need to revisit him quoting it

Jim, if you offered these I too would buy a set. ~Earl J

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Chris B
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« Reply #41 on: March 20, 2017, 01:01:33 PM »

What the hell...put me down for a pair.  Can't be the only guy on the block without a set.

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J_Speegle
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« Reply #42 on: March 20, 2017, 07:51:54 PM »

Just a thought, but would it be prudent to add something like a dipped material on the outside of the tool to prevent scratching nicely restored suspension pieces?  It would also limit the possibility of the tool slipping.  I know it wasn't originally spec'ed out, but I'm sure they could never have conceived of these vehicles being concours restored so many years later.

Maybe powder coating would hold up better and insulate the edges some what, as well as keeping them from rusting.

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Jeff Speegle
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« Reply #43 on: March 23, 2017, 05:00:19 AM »

OK just saw this. We've had a cure for this for years and it's much easier. Cut 4" pieces of 2x3 and while car is on ground place between bottom of upper control arm and spring pocket. When lifted in keeps suspension from fully extending and won't scratch
Pretty economical as $2.00 2x3 yields enough for 12 cars  Chug a Lug

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68GT350Bill
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« Reply #44 on: March 23, 2017, 06:48:57 AM »

This is perhaps a dumb question but how is it that most of us managed to get along without employing this precaution (while changing flats, doing shade tree repairs, etc) for the past 50 years without a problem? I'm also reasonably sure that a lot of repair shops (non Ford dealers) didn't use anything to support the suspension.

Not saying this isn't a good idea...once I install the front shocks on #1487 you can bet that I'll be employing a couple of wood blocks per Tim's suggestion...but, is it really that big of a problem as long as you are careful?

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