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Author Topic: SWAY BAR POSITION ISSUE  (Read 3069 times)
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Bob Gaines
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« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2016, 11:46:14 AM »

Thanks all for the input regarding my sway bar. I have a few questions and a comment. No, the car has never been wrecked..  "The only thing that keeps the bar centered is how the end links load it." Is it possible to effect the way the end links load the sway bar to get it more centered? Would new or a different size end links change the resting position of the sway bar. What is the likelihood of the sway bar itself being the problem, such as it being bent? When I had the car on a lift and the suspension hanging down, I recall the sway bar eyelet on the drivers side was at an odd angle and it was pulled quite a bit away from the bushing. The passenger side was not at all like that. mike
A bent swaybar certainly could cause issues. You might take it off and lay it flat on the floor . If it is bent you should be able to the difference side to side and up and down. I hope this helps after getting off track on the Shelby swaybar. Chug a Lug

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mike67gt
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« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2016, 01:04:01 PM »

bob, thanks for your reply. I did remove the  sway bar to check it to see if it was bent and it seemed to be symmetrical as far as I could tell. As, I've continued to research this issue, I have found several others complaining of the same problem of an un-centered front sway bar, albeit, they're weren't on a 67 mustang or any another vintage mustang. But, the sway bars in question were very typical and looked very similar to the sway bars used on vintage mustangs. And, what they were pointing to as a potential cause is the lack of bushing "stoppers" on their sway bars (see photo). What do you think of bushing "stoppers"? Would they be advisable to use on a vintage mustang where a sway bar won't stay centered or would that be a bandaid without finding the actual cause. Also, as I mentioned earlier, I have greased polyurethane bushings on my sway bar, if I replaced the bushings with OEM rubber bushings with no grease, could that resolve the issue. mike



* front-sway-1.jpg (8.09 KB, 800x600 - viewed 116 times.)
« Last Edit: November 07, 2016, 02:45:11 PM by mike67gt » Logged
Bob Gaines
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« Reply #17 on: November 07, 2016, 02:49:36 PM »

bob, thanks for your reply. I did remove the  sway bar to check it to see if it was bent and it seemed to be symmetrical as far as I could tell. As, I've continued to research this issue, I have found several others complaining of the same problem of an un-centered front sway bar, albeit, they're weren't on a 67 mustang or any another vintage mustang. But, the sway bars in question were very typical and looked very similar to the sway bars used on vintage mustangs. And, what they were pointing to as a potential cause is the lack of bushing "stoppers" on their sway bars (see photo). What do you think of bushing "stoppers"? Would they be advisable to use on a vintage mustang where a sway bar won't stay centered or would be a bandaid without finding the actual cause. Also, as I mentioned earlier, I have greased polyurethane bushings on my sway bar, if I replaced the bushings with OEM rubber bushings with no grease, could that resolve the issue. mike
Mike ,yes the oem rubber without grease may solve the problem. You could probably be able to to clean off the grease on the poly urethane and roughen up the inside to accomplish the same thing but it will be squeaky I bet if it doesn't slide. The hard plastic is meant to eliminate the stretch for a stiffer ride . People grease them because they are squeaky because they do not give like rubber. The bars are not meant to be greased. That is sometimes done to eliminate squeaking. The un greased rubber will grab the bar when tightened down. The rubber will stretch some when put under tension but typically snap back instead of slide.There are other places where the stock bushing is meant to grab and not slid like idler arm,spring perch,front eye of the rear leaf spring to name a few,there are others. I assume the bar is centered when you bolt it up if not then things will not change with the OEM bushings. I will be honest and say I am not sure what the consequences if any there are suspension wise if the bar is un centered. I hope that does it.keep us posted. Chug a Lug  

« Last Edit: November 07, 2016, 02:52:30 PM by Bob Gaines » Logged

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mike67gt
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« Reply #18 on: November 07, 2016, 03:55:39 PM »

bob,

The only consequences of the bar not being centered is that because it so close to the strut rod bracket, sometimes I will get clunking sound if it hits the bracket. Do you have any opinion regarding the bushing "stoppers", that I mentioned in my last post.

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Bob Gaines
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« Reply #19 on: November 07, 2016, 04:16:07 PM »

bob,

The only consequences of the bar not being centered is that because it so close to the strut rod bracket, sometimes I will get clunking sound if it hits the bracket. Do you have any opinion regarding the bushing "stoppers", that I mentioned in my last post.
If it is banging against the strut rod bracket it has definitely too much clearance to move. The stoppers should not be needed on a stock installation IMO . I have never seen them except on a track specific car. I would clean off the grease and try the stock bushings . Be sure to have the corresponding stock bushing brackets too. depending on the aftermarket bushings ,a larger size aftermarket bracket accompanies the different after market bushing.

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ed meyer
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« Reply #20 on: November 08, 2016, 06:35:51 AM »

mike don't know where the 2 sway bars in your picture came from but that type wont work on mustangs since the end eyelets are sideways not flat to work with the ford end link kits.

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stickshift
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« Reply #21 on: November 08, 2016, 07:41:20 AM »

mike don't know where the 2 sway bars in your picture came from but that type wont work on mustangs since the end eyelets are sideways not flat to work with the ford end link kits.

I think they are ADDCO bars that are made to use "rod end", end links. They are smoother bars to load then the stock "ball" design which tends to be "herky-jerky" under load.

The flat washers would tend to reinforce that observation.

The ADDCO is what you would use for auto-cross for the smoothness reason.

« Last Edit: November 08, 2016, 07:43:35 AM by stickshift » Logged
mike67gt
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« Reply #22 on: November 08, 2016, 09:33:36 AM »

meyer and stickshift thanks for your replies. I am not considering putting a new or different sway bar on my car. The photo of the sway bars was only to illustrate the bushing stoppers. Bushing stoppers can be fixed or loose and can be added to any existing sway bar. Some vehicles come from the factory with fixed sway bar bushing stoppers like the ones in the photo. The reason I brought up the subject in the first place was as a possible remedy for my 67 mustang where the sway bar won't stay centered. regards  mike

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stickshift
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« Reply #23 on: November 08, 2016, 10:43:31 AM »

meyer and stickshift thanks for your replies. I am not considering putting a new or different sway bar on my car. The photo of the sway bars was only to illustrate the bushing stoppers. Bushing stoppers can be fixed or loose and can be added to any existing sway bar. Some vehicles come from the factory with fixed sway bar bushing stoppers like the ones in the photo. The reason I brought up the subject in the first place was as a possible remedy for my 67 mustang where the sway bar won't stay centered. regards  mike

In my view, it is unusual to need the stoppers on any of the Mustangs. I haven't looked recently, but take a trip to Cobra Automotive and see what Curt and company have for this application.

Anti-sway bars are heat treated "spring" steel. Welding on that can be tricky, generally not recommended because you can ruin the temper of the metal and if that turns out to be a high stress area, you can be encouraging the bar to actually fail in that area or loose spring resistance there even if it doesn't fail.

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mike67gt
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« Reply #24 on: November 08, 2016, 11:08:53 AM »

stickshift,

Sway bars stoppers or collars as they're sometimes call are bolt-on, no welding necessary (see photo). Again, I'm just trying to keep my sway bar from moving around.


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stickshift
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« Reply #25 on: November 25, 2016, 06:52:55 PM »

Well I've got two of these cars. There is no evidence that the front bars have ever moved from side to side. I don't think you need the restrictor rings.

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