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Author Topic: Part 2: The First Rear Spoiler for the 1965 Shelby GT350? - Alex Tremulis  (Read 2792 times)
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A1965GT350
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« on: October 06, 2016, 06:23:25 PM »

Found this article interesting and with great period pictures. I have posted the following from the article. The full article is located here.
http://www.gyronautx1.com/live-updates/the-shelby-gyronaut-connections-cobra-engines-and-the-first-gt350-rear-spoilers

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The second half of the Shelby-Gyronaut connection revolves around Tremulis' attempts to create a more stable Mustang in high speed situations.  The fastback design had a tendency to have its front end become very light at high speeds.  Tremulis had reasoned that a spoiler placed on the rear deck would create the necessary downforce to hold the Mustang's front end down and provide stability during racing on tracks where higher speeds could be attained.  The following photos document his efforts to both create the spoiler for the 1965 Mustang, but also his first hand account of presenting the concept to Carroll Shelby and then finally proving out his high-speed spoiler on the Bonneville Slat Flats.

In 1974, Alex Tremulis recounted his reasons for building the spoiler and the meeting he had with Carroll Shelby.  The following excerp comes directly from his memoirs where he told of his adventures and mis-adventures:

While he was in the Los Angeles area he decided to show the spoiler-equipped Mustang to Carroll Shelby, designer of the famed Shelby American, a really fine racing car. Shelby and Tremulis disagreed over the effect the spoiler would have on the Mustang.  Shelby felt it might tend to push the tail down and confound the already bad habit of Mustangs to get airborne in the front at about 130mph. Tremulis theorized  his spoiler would create a new, high velocity vortex that would tend to suck air underneath the car and hold the nose down. It was a theory at this point and to test it required greater speed.

First, he got some big tires to step his gear ratio up from 3 1/2 to 3.  Then he went to see Joe Granatelli, one of the big forces in developing fast cars. He asked Granatelli to supercharge the Mustang. Granatelli suggested as a friend: "Look, Alex, you're 52. Why go out there on the salt flats and kill yourself?"  But he agreed to supercharge the Mustang and did.  Three days later, Tremulis is back at Bonneville.

"I'm down at the 10-mile markers and I wanted to salvage something out of the day, so I called into the timers and tell them to get ready, I'm coming through for a shot at the class B record. I've had runs of 152 and 154mph and I'm confident that this 271 hp Mustang, now supercharged to 420 hp will do it. If I hadn't been such an amateur, it would have, too."
 
What happened was he started too fast, poured too much coal to it, revved the engine to 6,800 rpm on the tachometer. At 155 mph the aerodynamic drag hit its maximum for the body design.  The engine was now turning 7500 in 3rd gear and Tremulis wasn't into his speed trap yet. Smoke trails poured out of the exhausts, tbe temperature gauge climbed.






The white Mustang 2+2 was owned by Alex Tremulis' wife, Chrissie.  It would be her car that would eventually be the test mule for the high speed runs.
Chrissie Tremulis with her pristine-looking Mustang 2+2.  She had no idea what was in store for her new ride. The spinner hubcaps seem to be the only non-stock exterior addition at this point.



 probably the first photos of the spoiler on her car.  In addition to the new spoiler, her car is sporting new rally stripes, one down the center in front, and two down the deck in the rear. 
The stripes were most probably added to highlight the profile and contour of the spoiler on the white paint, something Tremulis was very familiar with in his then three decades of automotive design.



Clearly illustrating the molded-in deck caps and the keyed entry, these photos appear again to be aimed at a brochure to highlight the new body pieces.











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2112
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« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2016, 07:11:25 PM »

I am glad it never made it into production on the 65'/66' and yet I love it on the 67'/68's.

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MyShelbyDream
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« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2016, 04:26:34 AM »

I am glad it never made it into production on the 65'/66' and yet I love it on the 67'/68's.

+1   Great attempt though.

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Brian Glover
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« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2016, 05:32:36 AM »

Note the cool graphic on the driver's side of the white van.

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65 GT350
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« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2016, 01:29:46 AM »

Interesting article on the Gyronaut Thanks for sharing

As far as the rear spoiler seems that allow of designers were working and making Mustangs with spoilers during 64-65. Pretty much all looked similar though some too different routes and had different details for one reason or the other.  Chug a Lug

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Jeff Speegle
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