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Author Topic: Check out "Are you ready for Scottsdale?" on saac.com  (Read 3177 times)
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Computerworks
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« on: December 28, 2008, 07:30:03 AM »

Be sure to read the latest SAACgacity (the semi-regular column on www.saac.com).

"Are you ready for Scottsdale?"

In this edition, Rick Kopec roasts the auction circus and talks frankly about the recent wave of tribute cars.

>Click here to read the latest SAACgacity<

Use this thread to discuss the article.

« Last Edit: December 30, 2008, 12:46:09 PM by Computerworks » Logged
CaptDave
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« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2008, 07:51:57 AM »

Really great article.  Everyone should read it from cover to cover.  Nice going Rick.  I so glad you only picked on a Green 1963 Galaxie (390ci) and not the Blue Andy Griffith 1962 Galaxie (292ci).

CaptDave

« Last Edit: December 30, 2008, 12:50:52 PM by Computerworks » Logged

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Rick Kopec
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« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2008, 10:51:10 AM »

Yes, Capt. And I also steered clear of the recent heavy interest in Mazda Miatas by a small band of clever insiders who have purchased a number of them from out-of-work stock brokers, hedge fund managers and private pilots and are attempting to manipulate a feeding frenzy over them. This will be the next trend to take hold. Miata prices are on the launch pad, ready for a take-off in values that will make an Atlas rocket look like a wet match. You heard that here.

« Last Edit: December 30, 2008, 12:51:09 PM by Computerworks » Logged

The people in the cheap seats always boo the loudest.
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« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2008, 12:46:31 PM »

does anyone under the age of 40 know what a 57 t bird is and is willing to pay 100k for one?Will anyone in 10 years?
  I can see in the next 10 years a large group of car collectors going to their graves with hordes of parts and cars that have only collected dust the last 20 years.Never enjoying how it feels to lay rubber on the street or drag race or open track it.....
   I wish I had some more garage space for some more beaters..So when these queens get sold for cheap I can fry their tires to the rim infront of the guys who owned them for so long.

« Last Edit: December 30, 2008, 12:51:23 PM by Computerworks » Logged


1965 Eleanor fastback 5.0L 5spd
1968 highland green coupe 289 5 spd
1988 black gt hatchback 5spd 13.80 quarter mile
2001 DHG Bullitt  number 3549  12.84 quarter mile
CaptDave
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« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2008, 01:39:12 PM »

Yes, Capt. And I also steered clear of the recent heavy interest in Mazda Miatas by a small band of clever insiders who have purchased a number of them from out-of-work stock brokers, hedge fund managers and private pilots and are attempting to manipulate a feeding frenzy over them.

I just heard that Barrett Jackson is auctioning a special tribute collector CaptDave Edition Miata (in official CaptDave Miata blue).  I heard there will be no reserve on this one.  The owner and BJ think it may set a record.

CaptDave

« Last Edit: December 30, 2008, 12:51:39 PM by Computerworks » Logged

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ernie
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« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2008, 02:43:05 PM »

 I remember back in 87 the stock market went in the tank and cars all went up maybe it will do it again. There still good money for good cars.

« Last Edit: December 30, 2008, 12:51:53 PM by Computerworks » Logged
Bill.
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« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2008, 03:24:56 PM »

As an ex B.J. auction participant (bought and sold), I tend to agree with the article as written, only thing missing is that when you step in to a B.J. auction you are bombarded by the finely honed sites and sounds that create an atmosphere unlike any other on the planet. Drinks flow freely (if you have the right bidding credentials), the auction assistance buddy up to you when you show even the least amount of interest in a vehicle (real bidders spend little time on the stage other than to check the car out one last time before bidding higher), talking with you to lull you in to a sense of false security that they have your best interest in mind while prompting you to bid higher and higher. Lack of sleep, lack of movement from your seat, lack of proper diet during the auction hours, along with the fast pace and the sounds around you all work against your mind being able to process it all and you start having lapses in judgement. Again, this is a finely honed weekend, they know exactly who you are, what your limits are, and in some cases exactly what you drink/eat/look at while on the auction grounds. Am I rambling a bit on the last one, perhaps, but you'll get the point anyway.....

So, how do you survive a B.J. auction, simple, walk the grounds, take notes on the cars you are interested in, drink lots of water (decline the booze at all times), eat small amounts every couple of hours. After you have made notes on the cars you (or in my case my clients) are interested in, go back and take a closer look at them in greater detail, make additional notes, and walk away to clear your head.....Now, before that item goes up on the auction block, factor in what the top dollar is that you are willing to spend on a particular car (add in 10% for the buyers premium and at least $1,500 to ship it home), write that number down and stick to it. If you live in the home state of the auction, add in your state taxes instead of the shipping costs. Keep in mind if you do not book the shipping of the car before the end of the auction, the auction company will charge you state taxes regardless of whether or not you live in that state. Shipping companies on premise will quote higher than usual prices unless you have a working relationship with them ahead of time and contact them about the possibility that you will be buying something and using them to ship it home.

Once again, if this is your first time at the auction, leave your checkbook at home (irrevocable   letters of credit are required, that or a suitcase full of cash to be predeposited with the auction organization), grab a seat, follow the above and you'll be good to go.....Choose not to listen to my sound advice, and you may end up spending more than you had planned, all due to the overwhelming atmosphere you encounter.


Bill S.

« Last Edit: December 30, 2008, 12:52:27 PM by Computerworks » Logged

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Cobra Ned
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« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2009, 10:37:01 PM »

The hell with it. I'm going, if only because I seem to fit Rick's profile. Actually, I go every year just to watch the show. It's like a car nut's circus. But no amount of booze will cause me to bid on an Eleanor. Uh-uh. Gotta draw the line somewhere.

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C5HM
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« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2009, 07:17:27 AM »

does anyone under the age of 40 know what a 57 t bird is and is willing to pay 100k for one?Will anyone in 10 years?
 

That's an increasingly relevant point in my opinion. When I was a lad, my Dad would take me to car shows that were largely comprised of early model Fords and Chevrolets and the like. Most were slavishly restored and detailed. Their owners were doddering old fuds (who look a lot like the fellow I now see in the mirror each morning). We know where those owners are now (heads up CS). But where are their cars? Gone for street rods everyone, I'd guess.  Could just be that such will be the fate (or worse) of the "muscle cars" at auction today. Especially since the pups that are coming up behind us seem to be more interested in  fart can equipped cars of the Asian persuasion (in some cases--God forbid--they even drive Miatas!).

BJ is a hoot to watch, but I can always detected the lingering scent of snake oil when the telly goes dark each evening.  As most know by now, though listed as "No Reserve", a good many of the cars "sold" at BJ go home to the same garage they arrived from (after their owners make the winning bid and  have the privilege of paying Craig Jackson--snake oil salesman that he is--the buyer's commission for "selling" their cars).  And, of course, the know-nothing, talking heads can be infuriating.

And then there is Jackson himself. I have never met a more self absorbed, grasping, baselessly condescending and superficial fellow. One wonders how the carnie world has survived his departure. He is a perverse joy to watch while vintage racing, though.  If you have never thought of a finely tuned, incredibly valuable, vintage Trans-Am car as a cudgel, just spend some time watching Jackson square off every apex on a road course (but don't stand too close to the armco). Finesse is made conspicuous by its absence.  The formerly convex throttle pedals in his cars almost always come back concave in configuration.   

Perhaps it is just me, but I find the bidding wars between the bucks up, old coots Rick references to be increasingly sad. There they are: Yacht Masters on wrists, silver hair plugs sprouting from formerly bald pates, cache Viagra pills close at hand,  20+ year younger, bleached blonde, trophy wives on their arms (and--even more pathetically-- sometimes with toddlers in tow) making public spectacles of themselves by exposing their assets on national TV---to impress just whom?

But, BJ is fun to watch. Probably in the same way that ancient Romans enjoyed the sport of Christian sacrifice in the Coliseum. It's all about the spectacle, after all.



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