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Author Topic: 5R002 being resurrected from its cryogenic slumber  (Read 32931 times)
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deathsled
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« on: March 24, 2013, 08:06:58 AM »

Exciting times await! 

5R5002 videos and documentation of the restoration.  Love it!

http://www.5r002.com/

I don't get the yellow engine.  Even the spark plugs were sprayed yellow!  (Well maybe it kept the rust away.)  But not mice!  See the video of the engine takedown.

I can't wait to see the finished product!

Richard E.

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harris speedster
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« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2013, 09:08:19 AM »

deathsled,
If I am not mistaken;
the yellow is a super rich formula of a zinc/combo other ingredients>> for metal protection.

I used in many years ago, that stuff is tough and it really protects well.
John


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Is this the first futuristic Exotic Supercar in the world.
No higher, longer, heavier or wider than a AC Cobra.

http://www.harrisspeedster.com/harris.html
http://www.autopuzzles.com/forum/index.php?topic=11958.0
deathsled
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« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2013, 09:19:29 AM »

Interesting.  Though water appears to have infiltrated one of the cylinders.  I don't know what they can do to fix that.  I would respectfully defer to a metallurgist's expertise.  Perhaps it would be better to mothball the original engine and toss in a four bolt main bearing SVO block.  Car looks amazingly intact.  I know there is a split of authority on whether to fix or leave as is. Leave as is and all one can do is look at it in a museum and imagine.  Bring back to original specs and involve the rest of the five senses.  The blast of the engine, the smell of burnt racing fuel and taste of acrid exhaust, the feel of the ground vibrating as it passes.  Wow!

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richstang
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« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2013, 11:16:35 AM »

Thanks for the update and link to those fantastic vintage pictures. Many of them from GVR and I have not seen before.  Chug a Lug

I'm curious why Howards 5r095 was mixed in the album.

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deathsled
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« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2013, 11:25:34 AM »

I don't know why 5R095 is in the album, but hey, any R model is a vision of loveliness to behold.  The 5R002 website has given me the impetus to finish my horror story about 5R529.  It is shaping up nicely.  I hope to have the story out in the next 60 days.

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06 GT
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« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2013, 12:49:54 PM »

I think the yellow was just a theme. There is also yellow showing under where the fender was removed.

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J_Speegle
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« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2013, 01:18:01 PM »

Thanks for the update and link to those fantastic vintage pictures. Many of them from GVR and I have not seen before.  Chug a Lug

I'm curious why Howards 5r095 was mixed in the album.

IF so it would be better if those pictures were labeled so those viewing would not assume they all came from the same car.

Must say great shots of John - if you know him his character (JMHO) comes across in some of those pictures as he focuses hard on a detail Smiley

« Last Edit: March 24, 2013, 01:23:04 PM by J_Speegle » Logged

Jeff Speegle
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acman63
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« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2013, 12:54:38 PM »

Interesting.  Though water appears to have infiltrated one of the cylinders.  I don't know what they can do to fix that.  I would respectfully defer to a metallurgist's expertise.  Perhaps it would be better to mothball the original engine and toss in a four bolt main bearing SVO block.  Car looks amazingly intact.  I know there is a split of authority on whether to fix or leave as is. Leave as is and all one can do is look at it in a museum and imagine.  Bring back to original specs and involve the rest of the five senses.  The blast of the engine, the smell of burnt racing fuel and taste of acrid exhaust, the feel of the ground vibrating as it passes.  Wow!


When you go to the level of restoration that will entail with this restoration, theres no way you wont use that block if at all possible or at least a dated  K code block.  I talked to Jerry Schwarz and he said that when a car came in they took out the engine and sent it to the race shop and you would get whatever engine back with no regards to matching it to the car so I guess theres really no way to tell if its the original serial numbered engine unless by some shear stroke of luck they got the same engine back after building the car first

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caspian65
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« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2013, 01:02:10 PM »

Another black primer/red-oxide front for you Jeff... seems this method spanned quite a few months at San Jose as I was seeing mid February cars done the same way.

Looks like a serious number of hours will be required to get the uni-body back right.  Big thanks for sharing pics on the web.

In regards to the motor, I'm sure the cylinders can be sleeved, not uncommon for race engines.

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Bob Gaines
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« Reply #9 on: March 25, 2013, 03:15:28 PM »


When you go to the level of restoration that will entail with this restoration, theres no way you wont use that block if at all possible or at least a dated  K code block.  I talked to Jerry Schwarz and he said that when a car came in they took out the engine and sent it to the race shop and you would get whatever engine back with no regards to matching it to the car so I guess theres really no way to tell if its the original serial numbered engine unless by some shear stroke of luck they got the same engine back after building the car first
I wonder if they used a lot of service blocks with no VIN stamp? It would stand to reason that the race shop would have spares on the shelf. Those spares would most likely be partially made up of service blocks.  Of course the only other engines pulled out of cars would be other R models so if a R model had a VIN stamped block it could be its own or it would match up with another R model or have no VIN at all . They were no dummies and from efficiency stand point there would be much wasted man hour labor pushing and pulling engines out of the street cars for race duty when a service block would be much more cost efficient and time effcient to use for a race engine build up.  It could happen in a emergency I guess but most likely service blocks if not another R model donor block IMO. 

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« Reply #10 on: March 25, 2013, 04:08:57 PM »

Awesome car congrats to John on getting to restore such great piece of Shelby history. The car is defiantly in the right shop. Maybe those shops in Oklahoma do know what there doing idea

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J_Speegle
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« Reply #11 on: March 25, 2013, 05:24:51 PM »

Another black primer/red-oxide front for you Jeff... seems this method spanned quite a few months at San Jose as I was seeing mid February cars done the same way.


Will have to ask John if the final (bottom color) is black out what we are seeing is the original color - Don't want to assume anything in this case. There are a few cars (by VIN before it that were black, and a few after it that are/were red oxide - sure wish we had the real build dates to make some of these easier

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Jeff Speegle
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« Reply #12 on: March 25, 2013, 07:35:06 PM »

another thought is this car ,  001  and 003 were the first GT350s with 6 bolt 289s and there was a pretty good lapse in k serial numbers (about 20,000 if i recall)   before the first street venice cars and other R models  were brought in.  These were probably the first 6 bolts the race shop had seen as cobras all used 5 bolts other than a few of the street C4  cars at the very end.  Odds are pretty good they got their original block for the first race. odds of it being original after a race season very low IMHO

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Bob Gaines
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« Reply #13 on: March 25, 2013, 11:14:12 PM »

Interesting.  Though water appears to have infiltrated one of the cylinders.  I don't know what they can do to fix that.  I would respectfully defer to a metallurgist's expertise.  Perhaps it would be better to mothball the original engine and toss in a four bolt main bearing SVO block.  Car looks amazingly intact.  I know there is a split of authority on whether to fix or leave as is. Leave as is and all one can do is look at it in a museum and imagine.  Bring back to original specs and involve the rest of the five senses.  The blast of the engine, the smell of burnt racing fuel and taste of acrid exhaust, the feel of the ground vibrating as it passes.  Wow!
I talked to John Brown tonight and he said the block in the pictures is not the original block and was probably 10 engines down  from original. He said the web site will  answer all of questions like that and they will be adding new info all the time. I can't wait.    Chug a Lug

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« Reply #14 on: March 26, 2013, 01:08:00 AM »

This is John Atzbach.  For those of you who don't already know me, I'm the current owner of 5R002.

Yes, 5R002 is currently under restoration by John Brown of Thoroughbred Restorations in Oklahoma.  

We have been working on a website to detail the extensive history of this car, and at the same time track its restoration.  The website is still under development and really isn't quite ready for a roll out to the public.  It was supposed to password protected and only viewable by the few of us who were putting it together, contributing initial content, etc; but obviously something went wrong with that and it was located publicly yesterday, thus the beginning of this thread.  We had planned to add more content to the site and iron out a few more bugs from the site before launching it, but since it's been found now, we've decided to go ahead and launch the site a bit early even though it isn't quite where we had hoped to have it prior to launch.  The tech guys took the site down this afternoon to iron out a few important kinks, but they will have it back up and visible again shortly.  The website address is www.5R002.com  .   As you are viewing it though, please understand that it wasn't quite ready for usage, so if there are glitches, issues, incorrect data, etc; please be patient with us while we try to resolve these issues.  Thank you in advance.

I'll answer questions and explain a few things in my next post.

John

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