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Author Topic: How to tell "original paint"  (Read 3186 times)
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Wood27man
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« on: March 13, 2013, 12:49:10 PM »

I posted about a'67 on eBay that is claimed to have "original paint." If I'm ever looking at a car that is claimed.to have the original paint, how do i know if it truly has never been painted? Is it the look of the paint itself? Is it the parts that ate painted that shouldn't be? Some guys can tell instantly and I'm interested what to look for. Thanks in advance.

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Coralsnake
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« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2013, 03:44:24 PM »

Its usually a combination of all those items and patina

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« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2013, 04:46:28 PM »

Plus paint meter.
Which is a hand held device.

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harris speedster
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« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2013, 05:23:26 PM »

wood 27 man,
A few easy tell tale signs are;
Windshield post where it is leaded to the roof skin, usually has stress marks and sometimes sand scratches where the lead settled/sunk over the decades.

Another is the roof line at the qrt panel where the factory welded them together.
Factory lead will have settled again, scratches, sunken area's and sometimes little pin size bubbles appear.

Hoods are often a little off in color also, as the case for 65-67.

Brass, small amount puddled>> somtimes shows through in the very edge of the rocker at the bottom, where the qrt meets it in the door jam.
BTW, the door jams usually still have orange peel.

Importantly, a repaint usually has all of these area's where lead was, as noted above, smoothed over and they look toooooo good !!!

It has probably been polished to death over the decades, so the rough orange peel may be gone.
On many cars, edges of fender lines and other sharp panel edges can be thin on paint, and sometimes full panels can show a hint of red oxide primer.

Hope this helps>>
John
  

« Last Edit: March 14, 2013, 08:01:18 AM by harris speedster » Logged

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shelby73
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« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2013, 06:12:18 PM »

It takes a lot of experience, something that is not learned on websites. It takes good eyes, forget paint meters they're for rookies.

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pmspero
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« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2013, 07:12:27 PM »

If it looks nice, no chance. If it looks old, crappy and in need of a repaint, you've got a shot. If indeed the latter, exercise Harris speedster's recommendations .

Pete

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papa scoops
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« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2013, 08:30:42 PM »

harris speedster is the most correct. my 68 has the flaws. take a pro. painter with you , they can spot it out, most will do it for just the thrill of seeing an original car. if the painter is under 50??? need the old frt's. like me. lot of details like jambs, hinges, tape lines, clearcoat (not) phred

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thefordshow
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« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2013, 02:23:48 AM »

I look at the windshield wiper pivots for over spray. Its not an area most folks don't remove or mask well to re painted. 100% original paint is rare, most would have blow-ins some where. look for paint a ridge on the rocker stripes from masking, any kind of over spray on original weather strips, trunk weather strip is a good point to start.

« Last Edit: March 14, 2013, 05:52:29 AM by thefordshow » Logged

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« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2013, 04:13:08 AM »

There's a bit of good advice in all of the above  harris speedster ,good points, and shelby73, true dat.
I have been painting for 40 yrs come august .
Yes , a respray is easy to spot , if thats all they set out to do.
But if it were a 25 year + restoration to factory practices an amateur could be fooled,  a pro will tell.
Take 6S2020 ,it got a color change from black to orange before 1970, but just say it got repainted black, then driven 7yrs then parked for 35 yrs with junk all over it, it has the time and patina to pass for original, and yes the lead joins are still as wavy as the ocean(just don't know if i can paint black over them and look at it) What stood out was the masked out side stripes, so there will always be signs, you just have to know where to look.
one is, take of the sill step plate, is the tape still there, is it painted, along with the wiring, if not it was masked, you can tell, if the plate was not removed then it was masked, you can tell.If the tape was removed it just don't go back the way it was from factory.
Also the best tool you can take on an inspection besides a torch and a mirror is the humble 3x2 flexible fridge magnet to find those bondo repairs. Chug a Lug

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Wood27man
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« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2013, 10:12:30 PM »

This is great stuff. There should be some original paint cars at SAAC in July? It will be great to check them out. Thanks for all of the replies and sharing your knowledge.
Jeff

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sinethomas
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« Reply #10 on: April 04, 2014, 07:31:05 PM »

Many of the car dealers have a device that can measure the thickness of paint or bondo to the metal. It works electronically and is very accurate. They are very interested in work that has been done to a potential trade in. Good luck

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Cobra Ned
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« Reply #11 on: April 05, 2014, 03:46:23 PM »

It won't distinguish original from new, unless there is more than one coat of paint, but I bought a simple tool many years ago called a "Spot-Rot" gauge. It's basically a simple magnet with a gauge that indicates paint thickness and how much stuff other than clean metal is beneath it. It is great for finding bondo and excessively thick primer-surfacers (which only new paint jobs would have). Funny thing is, I have yet to get it to work on 60's Cobras... Cheesy

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