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Author Topic: Spring Compressor Question  (Read 6348 times)
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Shasmu
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« Reply #15 on: March 27, 2011, 10:19:45 AM »

When you put the spring seat on, leave the nuts loose so it can rock on the a-arm. You will not have to compress the spring as much to install.

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pmspero
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« Reply #16 on: March 27, 2011, 10:41:28 AM »

Spring compression on an old Mustang has been an adventure until I made my own. It's very durable and has compressed dozens of springs the past 20 years without any worries.  The  threaded rod is 3/4" dia and 17" in total length. The spring plate is 3"x6" 1/2 thick plate steel with a 3/4" nut fully welded to it's base. The top plate is 5' dia and machined from 1/2" steel and counterbored to accept the thrust bearing. ( SKF #7305) The thrust bearing I used required a inside race bushing in order for the bearing to fit the 3/4" rod. I also machined a heavy washer to place between the 3/4" compressing nut and the bearing. I'll check my photo library to see if I've got any pics of it in action. However, I've got these pics for now. Hope they help.



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KensKR
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« Reply #17 on: March 27, 2011, 11:54:03 AM »

My spacer is a piece of 1/2" pipe 2" long.
Kenny

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Shasmu
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« Reply #18 on: March 27, 2011, 01:15:50 PM »

Spring compression on an old Mustang has been an adventure until I made my own. It's very durable and has compressed dozens of springs the past 20 years without any worries.  The  threaded rod is 3/4" dia and 17" in total length. The spring plate is 3"x6" 1/2 thick plate steel with a 3/4" nut fully welded to it's base. The top plate is 5' dia and machined from 1/2" steel and counterbored to accept the thrust bearing. ( SKF #7305) The thrust bearing I used required a inside race bushing in order for the bearing to fit the 3/4" rod. I also machined a heavy washer to place between the 3/4" compressing nut and the bearing. I'll check my photo library to see if I've got any pics of it in action. However, I've got these pics for now. Hope they help.
I like the bearing action you have going on!

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Rodney T
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« Reply #19 on: March 27, 2011, 07:52:32 PM »

The best spring compressor I ever used on a Mustang was the type that had the plate that touches the spring cast round and at a slight angle to fit the entire circumfrence of the spring.

Having said that, I have also removed the spring by using 6 radiator clamps.  3 on each side of one spring.  I don't recommend that and yes I do have all my original fingers. HeadSpin

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Shasmu
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« Reply #20 on: March 27, 2011, 08:18:10 PM »

The best spring compressor I ever used on a Mustang was the type that had the plate that touches the spring cast round and at a slight angle to fit the entire circumfrence of the spring.

Having said that, I have also removed the spring by using 6 radiator clamps.  3 on each side of one spring.  I don't recommend that and yes I do have all my original fingers. HeadSpin
 

The disk type compressor is shown in the Ford Shop Manual. Would love to find one of those.
Using radiator hose clamps would make me nervous.

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94Cobra
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« Reply #21 on: March 28, 2011, 05:46:06 PM »

The spacer worked great.  Thanks for the advice.   

HeadSpin





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KensKR
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« Reply #22 on: March 28, 2011, 09:55:12 PM »

Glad to see you got your suspension removed. Don't forget to post some pictures when it's all back together.
I made a few mods to my spring compressor at work tonight. Made a stainless spacer to replace the piece of pipe I was using and added a bearing.
Kenny


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Shasmu
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« Reply #23 on: March 28, 2011, 10:41:43 PM »

Ken.
Will the hooks hit the bearing before they are retracted enough to put into the spring?
Bearing might work better at the top of spacer?

« Last Edit: March 28, 2011, 10:43:59 PM by Shasmu » Logged

KensKR
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« Reply #24 on: March 29, 2011, 10:23:45 AM »

Thanks, the hooks retract to 3-13/16" tip to tip with the bearing at the top.
Kenny


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Shasmu
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« Reply #25 on: March 29, 2011, 06:37:27 PM »

Thanks, the hooks retract to 3-13/16" tip to tip with the bearing at the top.
Kenny

Grin

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94Cobra
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« Reply #26 on: April 03, 2011, 03:40:16 PM »

I soaked my spindles in gasoline and wire brushed them.  I found some factory paint markings.  The pink one is in the area of the upper ball joint.  There is a white or pink dab near the lower ball joint area.  There is yellow paint near the tie rod attaching location.  Now to decide if I should paint these spindles or just leave them as is and spray them with a metal protectant.  I noticed they began rusting almost as soon as the gasoline evaporated. 



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Bob Gaines
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« Reply #27 on: April 03, 2011, 04:17:15 PM »

I soaked my spindles in gasoline and wire brushed them.  I found some factory paint markings.  The pink one is in the area of the upper ball joint.  There is a white or pink dab near the lower ball joint area.  There is yellow paint near the tie rod attaching location.  Now to decide if I should paint these spindles or just leave them as is and spray them with a metal protect ant.  I noticed they began rusting almost as soon as the gasoline evaporated. 
Wire brush would not be my first choice under the circumstances Wink . For those reading- A stiff plastic scrub brush would be best to first start with. It will not be as aggressive as a wire brush but will still cut through grease. I would hate to see others reading not to consider a stiff plastic brush , kerosene , and elbow grease to first check for markings and to determine if surface just needs a little evapor rust or similar product and metal protector product to bring back the finish to original or if bead blasting and restoring the heat treated metal look is the the next option. Just some thoughts on the subject.  Chug a Lug Bob

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Shasmu
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« Reply #28 on: April 03, 2011, 04:33:50 PM »

   Sparks can come from either the wire brush, or the contact brushs if you are using an electric drill. Shocked Be careful.   
 Scotch brite pads can come in handy also.

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« Reply #29 on: April 03, 2011, 08:46:46 PM »

I personally feel that gasoline is an unwise choice to use as a cleaning solvent. Kerosene or mineral spirits are safer, IMO. Also, if rags are used, soak them in a bucket of water after using.  This will keep spontaneous combustion from occurring.

Joe

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