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Author Topic: random photos found on the web  (Read 457734 times)
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johngalt
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« Reply #2355 on: October 12, 2017, 10:44:32 AM »

I would have loved to see the ....QUICK CHANGE PADS.... that Phil Remington engineered for the Shelby GT40 cars applied to a drum brake entry by Holman-Moody.. Popcorn

Apology for nitpicking, but Rem engineered the concept of "quick change rotors" which is something MUCH more difficult than "quick change pads" (which had been around for years).  Brake rotors were self destructing @ Le Mans due to massive heat buildup while braking the heavy MKII's.  Rem's solution:  Quick change rotors.  Once the 2 caliper bolts were removed, the old rotor/hat could be slipped off the 6 drive pins and a new rotor/hat slipped on.  He also added a small aircraft cable to the caliper so the flex brake line wouldn't be stressed during the rotor change, plus hooks to grab the red hot rotor with.  Rem was truly Mr. Fix It.  Chug a Lug  

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gt350hr
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« Reply #2356 on: October 12, 2017, 11:29:01 AM »

   John ,
        I would like to add "humble" to your description .   Phil could "fix anything" and once fixed , calmly go on to the next "situation" no matter how complex , to be solved in a completely matter of fact manner. Even recounting some of his amazing accomplishments was like "this is just what it took", not "I solved it this way".  No overpowering ego at all.

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owner 6S477 HERTZ White w/Blue stripes-1of18-since 1974. OVER 3,500 drag strip runs made in it since then. My candidate for the "worlds Most drag raced Shelby" More added all the time.
honker
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« Reply #2357 on: October 12, 2017, 11:47:56 AM »

Coralsnake, those templates on the wall behind the Torinos at Holman-Moody in post 2346 by 1109RWHP, were, and I believe still are used by USAC/NASCAR to verify the body shape of cars. They are made up using production cars, like in the pic below from 1967.

Mike (honker)


PS: like in the pic, officials would check a car in the parking lot, there is a legend that teams would go to the expense of modifying a production car, put it in the parking lot, to try and fool the officials. 



* template67.jpg (62.26 KB, 594x594 - viewed 129 times.)
« Last Edit: October 12, 2017, 11:52:48 AM by honker » Logged
preaction
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« Reply #2358 on: October 12, 2017, 02:44:52 PM »

Drum Brakes?............ Popcorn............ Grin The drum set up is lighter than a disk set up with factory parts.


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honker
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« Reply #2359 on: October 12, 2017, 07:05:36 PM »

Two '67's one black, and a '69 or '70 'vert

Mike



* threeshelbysresize.jpg (59.1 KB, 800x423 - viewed 136 times.)
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Wedgeman
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« Reply #2360 on: October 12, 2017, 07:22:20 PM »

1974 ....4 66's...1 67....2 68's...1 69......1st ever meeting what was later to become WASAAC ( Washington State Shelby-American Automobile Club )   PeelOut



* 1974.jpg (5.71 KB, 680x480 - viewed 148 times.)
« Last Edit: October 12, 2017, 07:25:18 PM by Wedgeman » Logged
gt350hr
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« Reply #2361 on: October 13, 2017, 07:45:22 AM »



  Disc brakes were NOT Nascar legal back then.

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owner 6S477 HERTZ White w/Blue stripes-1of18-since 1974. OVER 3,500 drag strip runs made in it since then. My candidate for the "worlds Most drag raced Shelby" More added all the time.
427heaven
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« Reply #2362 on: October 13, 2017, 10:20:04 AM »

Drum brakes stopped 3600 lb 175 mph stock cars pretty damned good back in the day. Of course Danica wasn't a twinkle in her Daddy's eye yet. Chug a Lug

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8T03S1425
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« Reply #2363 on: October 14, 2017, 05:19:07 AM »

I had a '71 Mustang convertible back in the late '70s. It had a 351 Cleveland engine, 4 bbl, 4-spd, factory Hurst shifter, and drum brakes all around. Otherwise it was a pretty basic car, without A/C. I was told that drum brakes were preferred to disc brakes for drag racing. With drums, one could adjust them loose for no parasitic drag, whereas disc brakes always had some. Was that truly a drag racer's trick?

I sold it to buy a '70 Mach 1, Grabber Orange, with auto, shaker hood, and A/C. I miss both those cars.

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Have owned my '68 G.T. 500 convertible since 06/30/1976. Formerly owned 6S2295 and a few really cool Mustangs.
Rodney T
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« Reply #2364 on: October 14, 2017, 07:40:54 AM »

  True.  Read it in Hot Rod Magazine numerous times.
Quote
With drums, one could adjust them loose for no parasitic drag, whereas disc brakes always had some.  Was that truly a drag racer's trick?


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VTGT500
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« Reply #2365 on: October 14, 2017, 09:37:02 AM »

  True.  Read it in Hot Rod Magazine numerous times.

In another lifetime I spent time at Detroit Dragway around Holbrook's '68 CJ Mustang.  Asked why he swapped to front drums.  Answer was, weight.

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PBF
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« Reply #2366 on: October 14, 2017, 09:59:33 AM »

With drums, one could adjust them loose for no parasitic drag, whereas disc brakes always had some. Was that truly a drag racer's trick?


     Yes, discs generally tend to "drag" some, but for our race car we found that this could be rectified greatly by machining the o-ring (square-ring) groove in the caliper to reduce the intended swedging effect created as the piston & o-ring is pushed to the rotor under hydraulic pressure, and thereby allowing a freer floating effect for the piston & pads.  Also "loosen-up" the sliding mechanism for floating calipers to reduce load on the stationary side.  Party on

     Scott.

« Last Edit: October 14, 2017, 10:07:07 AM by PBF » Logged
Don Johnston
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« Reply #2367 on: October 14, 2017, 11:08:08 AM »

More random photos needed!

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honker
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« Reply #2368 on: October 14, 2017, 04:18:21 PM »

OK ! back on track ! not sure if this one has been posted before ?

'67 with big boots.   PeelOut

Mike (honker)



* 67bootsresize.jpg (74.06 KB, 800x1024 - viewed 96 times.)
« Last Edit: October 14, 2017, 04:20:13 PM by honker » Logged
2112
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« Reply #2369 on: October 14, 2017, 04:58:00 PM »

Love that picture. I believe there are 1-2 companion shots that go with it.

Making those shoes last a little longer so he can afford new tires.

« Last Edit: October 14, 2017, 04:59:55 PM by 2112 » Logged
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