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Author Topic: Magnum 500 Identification  (Read 37125 times)
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Shasmu
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« on: January 10, 2011, 09:08:03 AM »


  I would like to learn about the different versions of Magnum 500 wheels.  Smiley
 Show your Magnums here! Chug a Lug
 

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Bill Collins
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« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2011, 12:29:29 PM »

Most common Shelby mixup - original 14x6 1966 Hertz Magnum vs 14x7 1971 Torino Magnum (D1OZ p/n). Look closely at the area where the center meets the outer rim. The difference is the depth of the ridge at the base of the rim, which is the offset for disc brake caliper clearance.

The D1OZ 14x7 was sold by Ford in service for many years as an interchange part, and was also commonly available from Mustang and Shelby parts vendors, so most '66 350's restored in 1970's - 1980's received these wheels.

The third example is a 14x6 for a non disc brake application. Note lack of a disc brake offset. Commonly found on Chyslers of the period, but also sold in the aftermarket by Motor Wheel Corp (Manufacturer of the Magnum 500). Mount these on your GT350 and the front wheels will not turn!



* 66 14x6 Magnum Original 001.jpg (8.09 KB, 800x600 - viewed 666 times.)

* 71 14x7 Magnum D1OZ 001 Replacement.jpg (93.44 KB, 800x600 - viewed 575 times.)

* 14x6 Magnum Non disc brake Chrysler.jpg (80.9 KB, 800x600 - viewed 570 times.)
« Last Edit: January 10, 2011, 01:38:24 PM by Bill Collins » Logged

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« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2011, 02:54:51 PM »

there are also variation that were used by, but bolt on, from mopar, painted i think, and rambler, chrome. phred

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Doug C
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« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2011, 03:07:12 PM »

If I am not mistaken the original wheels have numbers on them; I am sure others on this site know better than I.  All I know is that I have 4 of them and need 1 more.

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66 "Red" Shelby Hertz, 2007 Shelby GT and 64 Tiger
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« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2011, 04:13:04 PM »

Most common Shelby mixup - original 14x6 1966 Hertz Magnum vs 14x7 1971 Torino Magnum (D1OZ p/n).

I think another common mixup is that the 14x6 wheel measures approx. 7 inches, outside to outside of rim width.  I know this is the improper way to measure rim width, but a common mistake over the years by some.

Also, weren't the original design 14x6 Magnum 500's outlawed in 1967 due to a change in laws regarding bead safety?  I've always been under the impression that is why the original style 500's have never been reproduced in their exact style. 

And yes, they do have some numbers and lettering on the back.  I can see a 3 and a D on the back of one of my originals, each digit on a separate "spoke".  I haven't looked at all of them yet to see if they're the same.   

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~ Bill
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« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2011, 04:16:36 PM »

If I am not mistaken the original wheels have numbers on them; I am sure others on this site know better than I.  All I know is that I have 4 of them and need 1 more.

Doug, do you need a driver quality wheel, or one that could be restored for use as a spare?

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~ Bill
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« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2011, 06:19:44 PM »

The rims were marked 14 X 6, JK, 795C, MADE IN USA, UNISTYLE plus a Motor Wheel marking, a circle with "M" over "W". The unchromed version does not have the "C" in 795C.  I have also seen 50795C.  Cory

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Bob Gaines
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« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2011, 06:40:23 PM »

The rims were marked 14 X 6, JK, 795C, MADE IN USA, UNISTYLE plus a Motor Wheel marking, a circle with "M" over "W". The unchromed version does not have the "C" in 795C.  I have also seen 50795C.  Cory
Just something to add to the valuable information Cory provided,  in that looking for or confirming the numbers is fine but the rim is the most important factor IMHO on a Hertz wheel. Some restoration companies save the center and replace it with a new DOT approved rim. It still looks wrong regardless if you have a repro center or original numbered center , if the rim profile is wrong.  The rim offset and profile is something you can distinguish more then ten feet away. It is nice to have both a vintage center and the vintage or correct looking rim but it is best that one becomes versed in knowing the difference between the rim appearance and profile before being overly concerned about looking at or for the numbers IMHO. Bob   

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Doug C
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« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2011, 06:54:05 PM »

Doug, do you need a driver quality wheel, or one that could be restored for use as a spare?

Sent you a private message - thanks

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66 "Red" Shelby Hertz, 2007 Shelby GT and 64 Tiger
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« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2011, 07:14:42 PM »

Some excellent replies, guys! Thanks for your input! Chug a Lug

Were the early Magnum rims riveted, or welded to the center?

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Bob Gaines
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« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2011, 07:34:31 PM »

Some excellent replies, guys! Thanks for your input! Chug a Lug

Were the early Magnum rims riveted, or welded to the center?
The rims were welded because the center was steel also. The only time I have seen a riveted rim was because the center was aluminum and the rim steel. some of the repro centers overcame that and mixed a steel slug in with the aluminum during the mold process so the steel slug would weld to the rim . The separating of the rim is the most delicate part of the restoration process of the Hertz wheel . I have been told you have to ether sacrifice the rim or the center when separating the two for rechroming.you have to cut the weld off.  You have to separate the two when chroming because it is impossible to polish close where the rim meets the center. It makes the most sense to sacrifice the center IMHO because they make perfect replica centers (minus any numbers) where as the rims are next to impossible to find. I am hopeful Jim C. efforts to repro the H wheel is successful.  Bob

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« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2011, 07:50:28 PM »

 I have seen many rivited chromed steel wheels. Not sure about Magnums.
 I thought welded was later dot approved style for steel wheels.
The rims were welded because the center was steel also. The only time I have seen a riveted rim was because the center was aluminum and the rim steel. some of the repro centers overcame that and mixed a steel slug in with the aluminum during the mold process so the steel slug would weld to the rim . The separating of the rim is the most delicate part of the restoration process of the Hertz wheel . I have been told you have to ether sacrifice the rim or the center when separating the two for rechroming.you have to cut the weld off.  You have to separate the two when chroming because it is impossible to polish close where the rim meets the center. It makes the most sense to sacrifice the center IMHO because they make perfect replica centers (minus any numbers) where as the rims are next to impossible to find. I am hopeful Jim C. efforts to repro the H wheel is successful.  Bob

 

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Bob Gaines
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« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2011, 07:55:40 PM »

I have seen many rivited chromed steel wheels. Not sure about Magnums.
 I thought welded was later dot approved style for steel wheels.
 
I think welding is the cheaper over all alternative of the two IMHO especially from a mass production standpoint. Bob

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« Reply #13 on: January 10, 2011, 08:28:24 PM »

65-67 and 68-69 Rally Wheels were riveted.  This would seem to simplify restoration procedures.



* 68gtcszoll 053a.jpg (33.39 KB, 565x424 - viewed 339 times.)
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SHELB66
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« Reply #14 on: January 10, 2011, 08:28:34 PM »

Backspacing measurement is right around 3-1/2" with the Hertz wheel where lots of the Mopar rims are 4-1/4".  That's why they won't clear the disc brake caliper without a spacer.  Most, but not all, of the Hertz wheels share similar markings (795; JK Unistyle; 14 x 6; Made in USA).  If you look at the side of the wheel the weld line for the center piece is usually right in the middle for many of the Mopar rims where the Hertz wheel is off center towards the back.  It is a challenge to locate these.  It took me about a year to locate 5 and that's buying one at a time except for my last purchase where I located 2 wheels in a mismatched set of 5.  These are all nice driver quality except for the 1st one which needs to be re-chromed (see my previous topic post " Another Swap Meet Find").

Craig R.    

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